Water Education Foundation

MID, TID Boards Vote to File Don Pedro License Application

Posted by: Aquafornia on April 9, 2014 at 8:53 am

From The Modesto Bee:

“The Modesto and Turlock irrigation districts took a key step Tuesday morning toward using Don Pedro Reservoir for perhaps another half-century.”

Read more from The Modesto Bee

 

MID, TID Consider Next Step on Relicensing of Don Pedro Reservoir

Posted by: Aquafornia on April 7, 2014 at 9:49 am

From The Modesto Bee:

“The Modesto and Turlock irrigation districts could take another step Tuesday morning toward a new federal license for Don Pedro Reservoir.”

Read more from The Modesto Bee

 

Legal Alert: CPUC Issues Decision to Protect Solar Customers for 20 Years

Posted by: Aquafornia on April 2, 2014 at 8:46 am

From Best Best & Krieger LLP:

The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) recently ruled to protect all existing solar, biogas and wind customers under their current net-energy metering (NEM) contracts for a 20-year grandfathering period. …

“Best Best & Krieger represented the Net Energy Metering Public Agency Coalition (NEM-PAC) — consisting of nine California cities, water districts, school districts and private businesses — in this proceeding to safeguard public agency investments in renewable energy projects.”

Read more from BB&K’s legal alert

 

Commentary: Water Conservation’s Other Benefit: It’s a Power Saver

Posted by: Aquafornia on March 3, 2014 at 8:43 am

From the Los Angeles Times, in a commentary by Catherine Wolfram and David Zetland:

“Our conservation efforts, even the tiniest ones, have a second overlooked benefit: They also save energy. Water is essentially liquid energy. We don’t think about it that way. But every drop must be moved, treated and heated. Each step takes energy.”

Read more from the LA Times

 

New Sonoma Utility Promises Cleaner, Cheaper Power

Posted by: Aquafornia on January 8, 2014 at 8:51 am

From the San Francisco Chronicle:

“On Thursday, the governing board of Sonoma’s new public power agency plans to set rates for its electricity service, which will begin in May. Most customers will save money, compared to what they currently pay Pacific Gas and Electric Co.”

Read more from the San Francisco Chronicle

 

Folsom Park History Trail Hike is Hit

Posted by: Aquafornia on January 3, 2014 at 8:50 am

From The Sacramento Bee:

“This is the third year California State Parks has participated in the nationwide movement of offering First Day Hikes. …

“At the 17-acre Folsom Powerhouse State Historic Park, docents expected five to 10 people to show for the hike along the old canal route leading from the powerhouse to Folsom Dam.”

Read more from The Sacramento Bee

 

Yuba County Water Agency Bids to Renew License

Posted by: Aquafornia on December 31, 2013 at 8:57 am

From the [Marysville] Appeal-Democrat:

“The Yuba County Water Agency is filing to renew its operating license with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for the first time since the agency’s creation almost 50 years ago, and it will dictate how the YCWA will run the Yuba River Development Project for the next 50 years.”

Read more from the Appeal-Democrat

 

Conservation Groups Decry Lack of Protection for Fish

Posted by: Aquafornia on December 30, 2013 at 9:52 am

From the [Marysville] Appeal-Democrat:

“While some groups are excited about the what the Yuba County Water Agency’s FERC relicensing applications contains, other groups are lamenting what is missing — namely, provisions that address removing barriers to native spawning habitat for endangered fish.”

Read more from the Appeal-Democrat

 

What Water Can Learn from Energy Sector’s Efficiency Programs

Posted by: Aquafornia on December 23, 2013 at 9:47 am

From the Association of California Water Agencies (ACWA):

“This week [Dec. 19] the Pacific Institute released a new report that explores how California could become more water efficient by taking a page from the energy sector’s programs and regulations.

“The report’s recommendations include more robust and longer-term water savings targets; state-level efficiency codes and standards for toilets, showerheads and other water fixtures; tiered pricing structures and differentiated water rates that vary according to the time of day or season of the year; and state- and local-level adoption of a ‘loading order’ for water.”

Read more from ACWA

 

Sonoma Clean Power Projects Rates that Beat PG&E’s

Posted by: Aquafornia on December 20, 2013 at 8:52 am

From the Santa Rosa Press Democrat:

“Customers enrolled next year with Sonoma County’s startup public power agency could see some savings on their electricity compared to rates proposed by PG&E for 2014. …

The public venture is seeking to displace Pacific Gas and Electric Co. as the county’s main power provider by offering what supporters tout as a greener energy supply at a comparable price.” 

Read more from the Santa Rosa Press Democrat

 

News Release: Energizing Water Efficiency — California Energy Sector Experiences Can Advance State’s Water Conservation and Efficiency

Posted by: Aquafornia on December 19, 2013 at 8:42 am

From the Pacific Institute:

“As a dry December accentuates the stress on California’s limited water supplies, the success of the state’s energy sector in implementing efficiency programs offers valuable lessons to the water sector. A new report from the Pacific Institute examines the rules, regulations, and policies that promote energy efficiency and finds models for water management in drivers like the energy sector’s appliance standards, building codes, pricing policies, and utility-sponsored efficiency programs. …

“The new report, Energizing Water Efficiency in California: Applying Energy Efficiency Strategies to Water, can be downloaded free of charge from the Pacific Institute website.”

Read more from the Pacific Institute news release

 

Modesto Irrigation District Board Looks at Electricity Rate Hikes, Ponders Report on Drought Conditions

Posted by: Aquafornia on December 18, 2013 at 8:54 am

From The Modesto Bee:

“Whether area electricity customers could face higher rates in 2014 was called into question at Tuesday’s Modesto Irrigation District board meeting, with no clear answer. …

“Also Tuesday, staff presented potential reactions to drought, and the board continued taking steps to correct mistakes in expanding a water treatment plant that will cost taxpayers an extra $24 million.”

Read more from The Modesto Bee

 

New Modesto Irrigation District Leaders Told of Legal Issues Involving Rates

Posted by: Aquafornia on December 3, 2013 at 8:52 am

From The Modesto Bee:

“A different legal interpretation could make it easier for the Modesto Irrigation District to raise electricity prices, the utility’s lawyer told leaders Monday in their first gathering since three men were elected to the five-member board. …

“MID leaders last year declined to raise power rates, a departure from sharp increases every year since 2000, noting that prices had stabilized for natural gas used to produce energy. The change coincided with MID learning privately from a contract attorney that a partial rate bump could violate a new state law.”

Read more from The Modesto Bee

 

Technology Giving New Nations a Shot as Energy Producers

Posted by: Aquafornia on December 2, 2013 at 9:57 am

From McClatchy Foreign Staff:

“New technologies to unlock energy below the earth’s surface could transform the global energy picture, allowing a handful of nations not ordinarily thought of as energy producers to emerge.”

Read more from McClatchy

 

Shale’s Effect on Oil Supply Is Forecast to Be Brief

Posted by: Aquafornia on November 13, 2013 at 8:50 am

From The New York Times:

“The boom in oil from shale formations in recent years has generated a lot of discussion that the United States could eventually return to energy self-sufficiency, but according to a report released Tuesday by the International Energy Agency, production of such oil in the United States and worldwide will provide only a temporary respite from reliance on the Middle East.”

Read more from The New York Times

 

EPA Report Examines Water’s Importance to U.S. Economy

Posted by: Aquafornia on November 8, 2013 at 8:50 am

From the Association of California Water Agencies (ACWA):

“A new informational report from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency details just how important water is to the U.S. economy.

“Synthesizing recent studies on the topic, ‘The Importance of Water to the U.S. Economy’ report released this week finds that energy production, water supply and food production together account for over 94% of water withdrawals from the nation’s groundwater, streams, rivers, and lakes. This has created an energy-food-water nexus in which these sectors are interconnected.”

Read more from ACWA

 

IID Begins Presentations on Newly Changed Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates Program

Posted by: Aquafornia on November 7, 2013 at 8:51 am

From the Imperial Valley Press:

“Recent changes to the Imperial Irrigation District’s Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates program has an IID representative going to all the city councils in the Imperial Valley to make presentations on the changes.”

Read more from the Imperial Valley Press

 

IID Board Takes First Look at Budget

Posted by: Aquafornia on November 5, 2013 at 8:53 am

From the Imperial Valley Press:

The Imperial Irrigation District Board of Director s reviewed the energy department’s budget in La Quinta on Monday. It was the first of several scheduled 2014 public budget workshops.

“As presented, the $553 million energy department budget has a capital funding shortfall of about $39 million.”

Read more from the Imperial Valley Press

 

Dippy Duck Takes Energy Safety Message to Schools

Posted by: Aquafornia on October 30, 2013 at 8:49 am

From the Imperial Valley Press:

“Dippy Duck is growing up. The Imperial Irrigation District recently revamped its iconic mascot’s appearance and safety program to include an older audience. …

“Like the Dippy Duck canal safety program, the energy program’s message is simple and vital: electricity can kill.”

Read more from the Imperial Valley Press

 

Modesto Irrigation District Decides to Kick the Can Down the Road on Electricity Rate Hike

Posted by: Aquafornia on October 22, 2013 at 8:53 am

From The Modesto Bee:

“The Modesto Irrigation District’s power customers will have to wait until after the Nov. 5 election to learn whether they’ll pay more next year.

“Board members this morning will consider a $442.7 million proposed budget for 2014, but will punt on the politically sensitive question of raising electricity rates.”

Read more from The Modesto Bee

 

IID Works to Reach Students With Energy Safety Message

Posted by: Aquafornia on October 22, 2013 at 8:52 am

From the Imperial Valley Press:

“In honor of the 27th annual anniversary of Public Power Week, Imperial Irrigation District officials began rolling out a new energy safety campaign to reach seventh- and eighth-grade students in the Imperial and Coachella valleys on the importance of indoor and outdoor electrical safety.

“A newsletter, the ‘Safety Surge,’ has been distributed to junior high schools, according to a press release from the district.”

Read more from the Imperial Valley Press

 

Modesto, Turlock Irrigation Districts’ Deadline Nears for Don Pedro Reservoir Documents

Posted by: Aquafornia on October 16, 2013 at 8:55 am

From The Modesto Bee:

“A milestone is approaching for the effort by the Modesto and Turlock irrigation districts to renew their federal license for Don Pedro Reservoir.

“They plan late next month to file their draft application, a huge set of documents on how the reservoir and its powerhouse affect the Tuolumne River and nearby resources.”

Read more from The Modesto Bee

 

California’s Alternative-Energy Program Under Scrutiny

Posted by: Aquafornia on October 14, 2013 at 9:23 am

From the Los Angeles Times:

Even as California has scaled back education, law enforcement and assistance to the disabled in this era of financial stress, the energy program has continued unrestrained and is expected to grow significantly in coming years.

“State agencies have invested in milk trucks that run on cow manure, power plants fueled by ocean tides and artificial photosynthesis for powering vehicles and buildings.

“The spending is drawing increasing scrutiny.”

Read more from the LA Times

 

News Release: River-Friendly Landscaping Calculator Adds New Benefits for Sacramento

Posted by: Aquafornia on September 25, 2013 at 8:46 am

From the Pacific Institute:

“Sacramento County is promoting ‘River-Friendly Landscaping’ as a way for residents and businesses to beautify the county while saving water, energy, and money, and even reduce their carbon footprint. Last year the County partnered with the nonprofit Pacific Institute to create an online app to help people estimate the benefits of choosing ‘river-friendly’ plants and practices.

“Now version 2.0 has been released, featuring dozens of new features and enhancements, including a database of nearly 2,000 plants, complete with pictures and water requirements, to help people to garden and landscape in beautiful and more eco-friendly ways.”

Read more from the Pacific Institute

 

Federal Regulators: Columbia River Treaty Should Be Renegotiated

Posted by: Aquafornia on September 23, 2013 at 9:03 am

From The Associated Press:

“A U.S.-Canada treaty that governs operations of the fourth-largest river in North America — affecting everything from power prices and water supplies to grain shipments and recreation in the Pacific Northwest — should be renegotiated to make the system more flexible amid climate change and to aid threatened and endangered species that weren’t considered when the treaty was created decades ago, federal regulators recommended in a draft document released to The Associated Press.”

Read more from The Associated Press

 

State PUC’s Proposal for Utilities to Store Energy

Posted by: Aquafornia on September 16, 2013 at 8:51 am

From the San Francisco Chronicle:

“This month, California energy regulators proposed requiring the state’s utility companies to buy more than 1.3 gigawatts of electricity storage by 2020 – enough electricity to supply 993,750 typical homes at any given instant.

“The storage would help ensure that the lights stay on as California adds large amounts of solar and wind power – both highly variable – to its grid. Big energy storage projects would also cut the number of new fossil-fuel power plants built in the state. And they would make the aging grid more reliable.

“The proposal from the California Public Utilities Commission could also transform the storage industry.”

Read more from the San Francisco Chronicle

 

Power Plant Possible for Anaheim Basin

Posted by: Aquafornia on September 12, 2013 at 8:50 am

From the Orange County Register:

The Orange County Water District’s board on Thursday will consider whether to launch negotiations with a company that wants to build a power plant capable of generating up to 300 megawatts of energy on the same plot of land where Anaheim city officials want to open a park that would serve community sports leagues.”

Read more from the Orange County Register

 

News Release: Electricity Pricing Practices Offer Lessons for Water Sector in Promoting Conservation and Efficiency

Posted by: Aquafornia on September 12, 2013 at 8:43 am

From the Pacific Institute:

“Because water utilities are dependent on the sale of water to recoup costs, reduced sales can result in deficits – and per capita water demand in California has been stagnant or decreasing for the past several decades. Over the coming years, California municipal water utilities are required to reduce water use by 20%. Thus, the ‘new normal’ or an era of declining demand and rising costs is a trend that is likely to continue. Water utilities can learn from a number of electricity pricing practices to help adapt to this ‘new normal’ while staying fiscally solvent and providing fair prices. …

“In order to understand how some of these practices might be relevant to the water sector, the Pacific Institute examined a range of electricity pricing practices and policies that California electric utilities use to remain financially stable even when per capita demand is decreasing. The paper, ‘Pricing Practices in the Electricity Sector to Promote Conservation and Efficiency: Lessons for the Water Sector,’ helps inform discussion at the local, regional, and state level about water pricing in light of recent and future reductions in water demand.”

Read more from the Pacific Institute news release

 

 

News Release: Report Reveals Missed Opportunities to Save Water and Energy

Posted by: Aquafornia on September 10, 2013 at 8:44 am

From Water in the West:

“Water and wastewater managers are missing substantial opportunities to save energy and money, according to a report published Wednesday (Sept. 4) by Water in the West, a research center at Stanford University.

“The report, ‘Water and Energy Nexus: A Literature Review,’ also identifies the amount of water used to extract resources such as natural gas, oil and coal, and to generate electricity. The report finds ‘robust opportunities for reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, as well as for the conservation of scarce water resources, coupled with the potential for generating significant new renewable energy resources,’ according to co-author Cynthia Truelove, a visiting scholar with the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.

“The report is a comprehensive survey of publications by the academic, government and nonprofit sectors between 1990 and 2013 that analyzes policy, along with scientific and technical research, on the connections between water and energy.”

Read more from the Water in the West news release

 

Blog: Report — Saving Water Saves Energy, And Vice Versa

Posted by: Aquafornia on September 6, 2013 at 8:45 am

From the KCET ReWire blog:

“Savvy Californians know that cutting down the amount of water we use saves lots of energy. It takes a huge amount of electrical power to pump water to our thirsty cities, and when it gets there we burn natural gas to heat it. But did you know that saving energy also saves water?”

Read more from the KCET ReWire blog

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